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STERILIZATION

The Neglected One - Stray Or Ownerless

Most of the people hear him bark but how many take the time to see the sadness in his eyes? He is unwanted and ownerless. He has a group of friends and lots of enemies. He has no home and his food timings are not fixed. He has to fend for his own food, shelter and safety at the tender age of 3 months as soon as his parents drive him out of their territory. He has to fight death each time he crosses the street. Who do you think we are talking about? Well, its our very own "The Great Indian Stray Dog or "the Pariah" as it is commonly called.


Why play with nature? This is the most common question people ask us when we talk of sterilization. Just think, is it natural to keep a carnivorous hunting animal in your living or bedroom? Where did stray dogs come from? Like pollution and the hole in the ozone layer, the stray dog "menace" (as most people say) is also a gift of none other than the supreme animal - man. It is in the hands of us humans to at least try and rectify this mistake by sterilizing these strays in order to make their life just a little less miserable, then why not?


Mating happens in the middle of the road with ten other males trying to rip apart each other. Most of the male dogs die due to road accidents during the heat season. Just imagine giving birth to a litter of 10 and that too in gutter holes or makeshift ditches where there is no shelter from the sun or rain or even basic protection from predators. In spite of all the above is it fair to the female to see most of her puppies die a slow painful death, one by one either due to disease or road accidents?


Now think about the female which has to go through all this twice every year for 10 years. Do the strays deserve such hostile treatment from us when their entire life is nothing but a fight for survival at every step? They wag their tails to every passer by; they look at strangers for a pat on the head or a piece of bread. They guard our societies in the night and bark at all strangers thereby ensuring the best-unpaid security one could ever have. We do not force you to love these strays if you don't. But we do definitely promote and strongly defend their rights to stop people from thinking of them as being objects of sadism and believe that they should be just left alone. Let us join our hands together to ensure that the Great Indian Survivor gets the share of respect that he deserves.

 

Achievements

Sterilized

125

dogs & cats in

2004

Sterilised

286

dogs & cats in

2005

Sterilised

555

dogs & cats in

2006

Sterilised

1003

dogs & cats in

2007

Sterilised

1095

dogs & cats in

2008

Sterilised

1578

dogs & cats in

2009

Sterilized

1680

dogs & cats in

2010

Sterilized

1845

dogs & cats in

2011

Sterilized

1978

dogs & cats in

2012